"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world"
Nelson Mandela

Our Featured Products

Why is everything red, black and white?

Newborns cannot see as clearly as an older child or adult. Kwon (Kwon 2018) noted that at this age, the neurological pathways of the retina's rod's, (cells responsible for detecting black and white) are more developed than the pathways of its cones (cells responsible for detecting colour). Until your child is about six months old, he or she will respond best to bold, high - contrasting colours and graphics. That’s why it’s important to provide your baby with toys and stimulation material that are the visual extremes of black, white and red (Doman 2005:60). These high - contrast colours will captivate and hold Baby’s attention, encouraging visual development as well as physical activity – such as grabbing, wiggling, kicking and arm waving. Babies are fascinated with these high-contrast colours and they love it.

Weplaysmart supply educational tools and toys for babies, stimulating sensory, visual, auditory, movement, balance and language development from birth.

Why are the first 12 months the most critical?

Most of the brain’s cells are formed before birth, but the connections between the cells are made during infancy and early childhood. The more a brain cell is used, the better it functions by forming more connections and a thicker outer sheath. From birth the brain is rapidly creating synaptic connections. It is estimated that by three years of age, it has already formed about 1000 trillion connections.
Share to
×

Hello!

Click one of our representatives below to chat on WhatsApp or send us an email to sales@weplaysmart.co.za

× How can We help you?

Complete form to enjoy all our updates and specials notifications

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

We Play Smart will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and specials.